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English 66
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 66 (some duplicates have been removed)
happened in katrina. nbc's katy tur is with us from the hard hit jersey shore tonight. katy, good evening. >> reporter: good evening, brian. that is certainly the big question, up and down the new jersey shore, the aftereffects of sandy are still being felt. we're on long beach island. it's a barrier island, it's literally where the atlantic ocean meets the bay. and here, dozens of homes still look like this, their bottom floors completely washed away when the powerful storm surge came through. the last time kyle burns house looked like this was 1950, the year it was built. >> bed, couches, chairs, everything was just floating around. it was a mess. >> reporter: two feet of rushing water and sand soaked this third generation family beach home. with gas lines restored, the people of colgate on lbi are finally allowed to come back. >> they're old. '78. >> reporter: as residents count their personal losses, state officials are looking at the big numbers. >> when you look at the damage done because of the density of new york, the number of people affected, the number of properties affected wa
the evacuation occurred in new york after 9/11, thousands of people with the opposite of katrina because fema had control. giving up on iividuals helping neighbors, local government, that is a serious problem and why we are bankrupt. all the money that will go out, there is no money in the paint and -- bank so they will just borrow and print and centralize the power to be in washington dc part of that is bureaucratic and in sufficient. john: thank you for all you have done to wake people up. but i fear we will not have much convince -- success convincing people we don't need fema. even though government fails part instinct leads us to assume washington has the best. they don't. they fail all the time. fema fails constantly. after hurricane hugo one senator called it bureaucratic jackasses to get the hell out of the way. they said prove it but after hurricane andrew even in your times reported it is unclear who was in charge of the relief ever. mikulski said the response was seen as a disaster itself. they said they would fix it then came hurricane katrina and nobles to thousand people died. fema
the cuban missile crisis, 9/11, katrina, those were events that felt like the world were coming. there are people that are worried about other kinds of doomsdays and they plan on surviving. >> it looks like in has been another series of attacks, cyber attacks on united states banks. >> bill: recent cyber attacks could have doomsday style consequences. that has our government concerned. >> attackers could also seek to disable or degrade critical military systems and communication networks. collective result of these kinds of attacks could be a cyber pearl harbor. >> we have an insane regime in iran run by people who are psychotic who may get the nuclear weaponry to act on their insane thoughts. that means we could have a nuclear holocaust. >> what we depict on our show they have a variety they are concerned about. everything from tsunami to a nuclear blast. >> a koe executive producer of doomsday preppers. >> there are three touch stones. first touch stone is 9/11. second touch stone is destruction of american cities which is katrina. third touch stone is the financial collapse.
response administration missteps in the past, the slow response to hurricane katrina, the formaldehyde ligand trailers purchased for katrina victims to live in. and now it is becoming more and more clear hurricane sandy may well banother example of the government blowing it. it's a staten island resident had a same complaints residents of new orleans had seven years ago. where is fema when we need them. other problems ththat liberal bureaucracy huggers like to ignore. according to a new analysis from the heritage foundation, fema dollars after all taxpayer dollars look more and more like a goody bag, honeypot for presidents to raise. think of them as a political porkbarrel spending agency because that is unfortunately what it has become. the disaster declarations are on the rise. reagan had 28 per year on average. under nine under bill clinton. obama, 153. he takes the cake. heritage foundation rates to put this in perspective in somewhere in america in 2011 disaster occurred every day and a half. so strong it required the intervention of the federal government because each of these di
hurricane katrina. we really felt like we were being ignored. the rest of the country was seeing something, but it wasn't us. that dramatically started to change yesterday and cetainly today with secretary napolitano coming, the national ceo of the red cross. >> no doubt. the boots will stop hitting the ground, whether it is the red cross and fema. fema was knocking on doors. [talking over each other] neil: what we they doing when they were knocking on doors? >> giving people desperately needed information and letting them know what the processes and there were inspectors looking at how to assees the damage to the people can start to get some funding so they can start replacing in putting together their lives. going door-to-door is extremely important. a lot of things that happened today that, you know, need desperately to be done. we are still hurttng. it is a tremendous amount to be done. there are a lot of people are looking for answers and still haven't been gone through. the only backslapping that there should be at all is from the volunteers of the shelters and the hospital staff is
and not a problem and that was the same kind of initial reaction we got after katrina, 2005, i'm not again, not comparing the gravity of the two events, but comparing the immediate initial response over the handling of this event and what i'm noting is the distinct difference in the coverage of 2005 versus this storm in 2012. and whether it's going to be an issue a few days from know you. >> it could be. what we're seeing now that the mayor's moment of let them eat cake, passed, the marathon. i've yet to see him in staten island. >> neil: i don't know that he's been there yet. >> that's interesting. doesn't that tell you everything that your two people you listened and other lady you interviewed said. the fact of the matter is, there is a political effort to run the clock out and with the media just like they've done on libya, just like they've hidden the truth about libya, it's the hide the truth about this and the service of obama's campaign of the let's get it straight. the president-- >> and the first to take camera crews to go to staten island and show it, fox was. and other media glo
their lives. >> you remember this back with katrina, the same thing happened where a lot of residents in new orleans had seen a lot of hurricanes before. and they heard this is going to be the storm of century, and nothing ever happened to their houses, and they ignored evacuation orders. you can't -- there's only so much preparation you can do. you can never create a risk-free society. you can't prepare for everything. you know, but one of the things that has to happen in these situations for things to work right is for the government has a part to play, but individuals have a part to play, too. you've got to be working together so when people -- some of these people, obviously, their pain is genuine and totally understandable. but some of these people did, you know, were told to leave and didn't leave. and you understand why they didn't. it makes sense in human terms, but, you know, there is a responsibility that you have for yourself in addition to what the government obviously has for you. and again, if both sides are woaren't working together, that's when things fall apart. >> the perso
, i mean, the pain of losing your home is enormous and you know, after the hurricane katrina, we did hear similar noise with about, well, we shouldn't rebuild the lower 9th ward. in fact, there was never a sweeping federal policy to avoid rebuilding the lower 9th ward and it's been partially rebuilt a a lot of home owners privately made decisions, it's appropriate. on their own, i don't wish to continue with this, i can't do that again. and i think that's probably do something similar here. and let them make their own decisions and don't come in with sweeping policies and create some defenses from new york like colin has, you should not oversimplify oversweeping decisions here. >> weigh in on this, relocate or rebuild. >> there's a couple of interesting points that you brought up. one, if we allow the the government to dictate where people live. where does it stop? are they not allowed to live in the middle of the country in tordo alley, not allowed to live in california where their hou could be consumed by a forest fire not allowed to live along the shores of the mississippi in case
into so much more, your husband was sent six weeks for hurricane katrina and it's reminiscent in light of what's happened with sandy. >> absolutely, it's interesting. in 1992 with hurricane andrew, 70% of the support forces were active duty forces and 30% were guard. with hurricane katrina. that flipped. currently with andrew there are 6600 guardsmen deployed to help out with that effort and i think the role of the citizen soldier has just become even more prominent. >> alisyn: well, you're so right and thank you for helping us appreciate the national guardsmen this morning. the book is national guard 101, a handbook for spouses. thank you for joining us. >> thank you. >> alisyn: all right. it's the fallout over the newly passed law in washington sedate that legalizes marijuana. hundreds of people now getting free passes. we'll explain. plus, in honor our troops for veterans day, we've got patriotic painting on the plaza. i'll talk to him about his inspiration next. ♪ [ female announcer ] e-trade was founded on the simple belief that bringing you better technology helps make you a be
/11, katrina? in these uncertain times there are people worried about other kinds of doomsdays and they plan on surviving. >> it looks like another series of attacks, cyber attacks on major united states banks. >> recent cyber attacks on large financial institutions could have doomsday-style consequences. that has our government concerned. >> attackers could also seek to disable or degrade, critical military systems and communication networks. >> collective result of these kinds of attacks could be a cyber pearl harbor. >> we have an insane regime in iran run by people who are psychotic, who may get the nuclear weaponry to act on their insane thoughts. that means we could have a nuclear holocaust. >> the -- we have disaster scenarios from tsunami, earthquake, nuclear blast. >> alan madison co-executive producer of doomsday preppers, a reality program on national geographic tuesday nights. >> there are three touchstones for many preppers in terms of events that happened in our history the first is 9/11 the second is destruct of american city, which is katrina and the third i hear them talking
awaits. >>. >> bill: remr the >> remember the cuban missile crisis y2k, 9-11 the katrina? those are events that felt like the end of the world was coming. in these uncertain times people are worried about other kinds of doomsday and they plan on surviving. >>> it looshks like another cyb attack on the united states banks. >> recent cyber attacks on large u.s. financial institutions could have doomsday style consequences. that has our government concerned. >> attackers could also seek to disable or de frayed critical military systems and communication networks. the collective result of these kinds of attacks could be a cyber pearl harbor. we have an insane regime run by people who psychotic who may act on their same thoughts. with that we could have a nuclear poll cost. they have a variety of people they are concerned about everything from tsunami, earthquakes, huk layer blast. a reality program on the national go traffic channel at 9:00 p.m. there are three touchdowns in terms of events that happen. the first touchdown is 9-11. the third is destruction of american cities which i
. do you think they would have run the new orleans marathon the week of katrina? >> right. i don't think so. >> steve: of course not. >> gretchen: rest of the headlines for saturday. president obama ordering the military to send extra gallons of fuel to new york and in the wake of seand. gas shortages unless people panicked. gas will be rationed starting at noon people with license plates ending in odd number will only be able to buy gas. cars with license plates ending in even number can fill up on even numbered days. four ohio men busted for stealing mitt romney campaign signs. some were found in a union truck. police found tools that could be used to take signs down. local campaign workers have had problems with signs being stolen. this the is first time someone has been caught. the men were arrested and face misdemeanor charges. people in parts ofism know are going to have to pony up extra money if they want to buy a gun now. cook county, which includes chicago, has approved a tax that charges people 2 a dollars for every gun that they buy. well, the move is expected to raise
health there. you and i have talked a lot about hospitals in the wake of katrina. why do people put the power in the basement? it seems to me the first thing that's going to go in a flood or any kind of, not even a major a storm, but a minor storm, is your basement's going to flood. >> this has been a bit of a technological whack-a-mole here, because we realized after katrina, and even after the blackout of 2003, we had to do something about backup generators in hospital. and so we moved the generators upstairs, but left the fuel pumps down in the basement. so we fixed the initial problem and have a secondary that no one seems to have thought about. >> okay, is that just complete stupidity, or is that, listen, it's financially expensive and people make the gamble, we're not going to invest the money and hope for the best. >> i think in this case, it was not paying attention to all of the details. i think people were well meaning. i don't think there was any sort of gross negligence here, except that somebody forgot an essential detail, in a situation that requires extraordinarily ex
storm behind hurricane katrina seven years ago. president obama is scheduled to visit the new york area next thursday to see the recovery operation firsthand. the definition of insanity is doing the same thing over and over and over again. and expecting different results. so how does this apply to obama's next four years in office? the green companies backed by your taxpayer dollars? they just grow and grow. many of them are hemorrhaging cash by the day. others have gone bankrupt altogether. our next guest is you can expect nothing but the same under this administration. a senior fellow joins us now. robert, always a pleasure to have you on the show. we assumed that it was safe to bet that the president would be doubling down on his green debt in his new administration. i hope he takes a different path. because we have seen solynda and beacon power and a123 systems. it has been extraordinarily costly. i think a better path if he is interested in green technology to reform the research and development efforts at the federal level. so that f there is some breakthrough to be had, the fede
wildest imagination see the destruction. i mean, this is our katrina. you know, unfortunately, those poor people went through this x number of years ago, ten years ago. now it's our turn. and you don't know where to begin, where to start. i got good friends and family. everybody has been coming down trying to help me out, trying to do whatever we can to move ahead and it's confusing. it's mind boggling. it's uncertainty. it's my life. the restaurant was my 30 years of adult life. my home. i lost everything. >> can i ask you, you've been frustrated with what the insurance will and will not cover. you said you had hurricane coverage, but that will not take care of your damage. >> in 30 years of business here, i've never had one drop of water. and we have had many, many, manies storms. irene last year which pelted us with 13 inches of water. i never had a problem with water. okay. this wasn't a flood issue per say. this was a tsunami issue. how do you prepare for something like that? >> gregg: if you want to help the recovery efforts, it's easy to donate not red c for example. you can go on-
katrina. bill: that is remarkable. let me get to that in a moment. next we are we can expect more of these. >> that's right. every 11 years the north pole and south pole flip releasing a burst of radiation and hot plasma are shooting into outer space. one of these days one of these bullets could hit the earth. bill: what will happen then? you will lose your blackberry. >> first we'll lose fox news. teltelecommunications will be knocked out. satellites will be fried. this is an unlikely event, power stations could get shorted out. physicists have estimated property damage at the level of $2 trillion or about 20 times the damage of hurricane katrina these numbers were done by the military and by the american physical society. bill: when was the last time that happened. >> you have to go back to 1859 or so. the carryin car shall carrington event. we didn't have satellites back in the 1800s and we've only had a few cycles with the space-age to worry about. power plants have been knocked out in quebec and other cities because of solar flares that graze the earth. a direct hit, though rare could
. but it's brutal. this is our version of katrina. i've been touring the south shore today in my district, and the devastation is enormous. what you're showing on your screen is typical of many areas on long island. right now the county executive is meeting with fema to set up plans as to how the recovery will take place. work is coming in from all over the country to work with lipa, to restore the power, but it's going to be a tough haul. i can say that everything that can be done is being done. over the next several days, you'll see more power being restored. this could go on for another ten days to two weeks. >> are there still people missing? there are a lot of people who chose to ride this storm out. a lot of people who weren't even in areas that were supposed to be at high risk and they're still there. >> yeah. for instance, long beach, which is an island 30,000, 40,000 people on the island. many of them stayed, and i was talking to several people today. and this is just anecdotal. friends of theirs who cannot find their wife or daughters or their sons, cousins, people in homes who
. by comparison, when a half million without power in the south five days after hurricane katrina. some relief for those in manhattan, new york city mayor michael bloomberg promising that most of the burroughs power will be returned by midnight tonight. but any progress on that front has been severely undercut by long lines again -- attestations the new york governor saying he signed an executive order waiving a requirement that fuel tankers register and pay taxes before unloading insisting his order we will help get gasoline to consumers faster. it is estimated that two-thirds of gasoline stations in new jersey and new york are not in business right now. however, it is little comfort for people stuck for long hours in long lines to with no guarantee that they will get gas at the end of that line. but some people, at least some are beginning to dry. this is a very serious and frustrating matter for literally millions of people in this region. turning now to benghazi, almost two months after the terrorist attack that killed four americans, the cia has released a new timeline, a timeline of its
is looking like hurricane katrina in one key respect and that is the price tag. steve liesman joins us now with more. billions and billions more. >> yeah. becky, the cost of sandy keeps rise and while it has not risen to the price tag of katrina, as the rubble is removed and the costs are tallied, the two storms are looking similar in the tale of devastation they tell. aid will arrive on a city focused on cutting spending. federal emergency money is subject to automatic cuts if we get over the cliff. this is the latest data putting at $70 billion to $90 billion. yesterday governor cuomo came out with this number. we know that includes what mayor bloomberg said was 19 billion. add that to what governor christie said of 29 billion. >> 360 million? >> for connecticut. >> and yesterday a company that we've been following since the beginning practically doubled their estimates of insured losses. originally 7 to 15. now 16 to 22. what i cannot tell you folks is whether or not the insured losses are included in the new york and new jersey governor statements. it could be 70 billion. governor cuom
katrina. you can see it's following a very, very similar pattern there and the expectation is that it will come down again on thursday to 390,000. one more thing i want to look at is gdp during katrina. a slowdown during katrina you can see right there, that's third from the right there. that's the quarter it happened. second from the right is the quarter after and then you can see the pop in the first quarter of '06. drag on growth of commerce and economic activity disrupted followed by a rebound as rebuilding begins in earnest. we're looking for a revised number on gdp but a weaker quarter in the fourth quarter. the overridie inine ining gdp i sandy but the fiscal cliff. >> steve liesman. online retailers stacking up the deal offerings on this cyber-monday. still ahead, ceo of home shopping network gives us a read on traffic that company has been seeing thus far. plus, tyler and cameron winklevoss headed to post 9. we're back in two. [ male announcer ] how do you trade? with scottrader streaming quotes, any way you want. fully customize it for your trading process -- from
it? >> fema responds rather adroitly to -- katrina notwithstanding, to these disasters. i suspect they're going to be quite responsive right now for those who have been displaced, who have lost family members, who don't have homes. i think there will be a rapid response from the federal government. >> i'm just saying, we could use that money in other areas right now. not necessarily the bond buying program. just an observation. >> maria, i got say, i don't know if the bond buying is actually helping. we're seeing a lot of bond buying. i don't know where that money is going to. we see unemployment raising. >> is survey showed pick ups in demand for most classes in lending right now. so it has had a positive effect in a place where it could matter. we have seen in general some of the interest rates that matter go down in the economy, including mortgages. >> and a big uptick in housing. >> maybe not perfect, but it seems to have had an effect. >> do we anticipate the typical pickup in economic activity following a natural disaster of this magnitude here, ron? >> bill, listen, it's go
extraordinary stories of strangers helping strangers. we have seen that. we saw it in katrina, in haiti, and here as well. we just met a young woman, may y beth, a graduate student of the college of staten island, who took it upon herself to see that the hungry in this area were fed. she and some friends cooked up food and set up a distribution center right on the street. no one asked them to do it. they just stepped up to help. mary beth, who is blind, has her guide dog with her, we talked a short time ago. what made you come out here? >> today, one of my classmates, her name is jennifer, she reached out for help and told us that there was no services, they had no power, they were hungry, they were cold. so i cooked up some food, i brought it down, i reached out to my classmates. they brought down food so between myself, ruth, george, debbie, we brought down food and then all of a sudden, we became command central and the national guard, the fdny had dropped off everything. >> you've become like a command central here. >> we became command central. what we did is i went to my classes,
. in 2005, think back to hurricane katrina. in 2001, president bush appointed joseph, the chief of staff in texas and the 2000 campaign manager, but no emergency management experience. under president bush, the number of political appointees went from 27-38. he brought in michael brown, his college roommate. now in 2003, michael brown took over fema. he also had no previous emergency experience, the u.s. commission of the international an arabian horse association which was his qualification. hurricane katrina hits new orleans, brown took control of the relief effort, but it was a disaster both literally and figuratively. you may remember president bush said, you're doing a heck of a job. it became clear that he could not handle it, and he was replaced by the coast guard, a career professional that handle the and a good job. of course, the katrina disaster was not all brown's fault. the appointment is an illustration of the problem, an increasing number of appointees, the lack of emergency management experience, layers of political appointees over career professionals, they thought it wa
policy to finances to the response to hurricane katrina. what president obama did when he came into office was strongly and unapologetically assert the government's role in dealing with our problems. in a wide array of markets. the insurance market, the car market, small businesses, tax reform. he did that at great personal, political risk. and what he got back in return was, a very strong attack on the notion that we're in this together and that government has a role to play. first in the grass roots of the tea party on the ground and then in the air in what you documented, martin, and what the audience knows, one of the most well-funded attacks in the history of american politics. what i think happened last night is more than just a re-election of barack obama as a man that people trust to lead our country, which is, i think, good. i think something deeper happened. i think there was an endorsement of the notion, liberal notion, that government has a role to play here and can help everyone and even the playing field. i think we're in an historic period today. >> people said y
and in some respects, it was a natural process after hurricane katrina where they could start over again. the other places homeland where i think there is more choice. if you look at the results, it is amazing. but about a third of the kids in harlem are in this district. they went up dramatically when they started this process there. it was something like 28 out of 30, now it is about 16. not only did the charter school is almost outperformed everybody, but the public schools, which were 28, actually moved up significantly themselves. so i think those are two substantiation of models that could be developed. so in terms of difference of reforming and relinquishing, i think it is very important as an idea that needs development. that is where i would come down. >> i would have to agree that it is choice. for two reasons. there is a catalytic effect, if you will. going against an attrition or a system, if the college isn't getting applicants, he will either go out of business or there is a catalytic effect on the underperformers of having people be able to make choices with their kids, an
from generation -- >> steve: it's bigger than katrina. >> it is in terms of the houses destroyed. yet houses that are uprooted and houses that never can be rebuilt where they are right now, you have to raise them, tremendous capital investment that has to be made. >> brian: i just think the governors and leadership have these trailers. they're already made. they just need to be delivered. no one -- >> that's not a solution. >> brian: no but it is a short-term solution because there is heat and running water because you can begin to rebuild. >> i think the frustration is less on the temporary housing housing and what the long-term slew us is. how are they going to rebuild if they don't have insurance? >> brian: i challenge you on that. it's freezing and there is no hotels. and these people need to be able to take a shower. >> steve: people living in their cars. >> brian: i'm seeing it. >> i am not going to object -- i think most of the people are housed now temporarily. i don't think the problem is for
katrina the price of gas went up, but that's because that storm struck in a different region of the country. >> well, yes indeed. 25% of the nation's refining capacity is on the gulf coast. katrina was a category 5 storm which meant refineries near the coast took a lot more wind, a lot more water, although sandy was properly named a super storm, it didn't have the sustained wind that we see on the gulf coast with a category 5, and so you didn't have anywhere near the damage to the production facilities. but what makes the new york area, new jersey, new york, connecticut so complicated, matt in, terms of the supply system is you don't have that many refineri refineries. therefore you rely on pipelines and ports, and the ports took quite a bit of damage. you couldn't get barges and ships in there right away. >> right. >> the refineries weren't too badly damaged, but the pipeline was also shut down for a while because it exits on the water. >> let me ask you this then as someone who knows the industry and the delivery system very well. how long do you think this situation is goi
. joining us now to talk about this is dr. erwin redlenner, he has studied how hospitals handled katrina. he knows everything, really, about disaster preparedness. and doctor, i have to ask you this. we've seen a lot of businesses, big businesses like goldman sachs, big buildings downtown on generator power. they're up and running. why not a hospital? >> well, it's not clear why not a hospital. and one of the problems here is initially, years ago, we had generators in the basements of hospitals, which is obviously something that doesn't really work, because when they get flooded, the generators go out. so they moved the generators up to higher elevations, but leave the fuel pumps down in the basement. and those fuel pumps are susceptible to flooding. it's just a detail that turns the out to be extraordinarily important when the time comes to actually use those generators. >> seems like a crucial detail right now. the president of new york city is helping the hospital corporation, asked by cnn's erin burnett last night, if hospitals were ready for this. let's listen to his answer. >> well, th
this for the next 53 days. christine romans, thanks very much. 27 minutes after the hour. they did it after katrina. and fema might do it again to help the victims of sandy. it's coming in the home of mobile homes. we'll tell you all about it. ♪ [ male announcer ] how could a luminous protein in jellyfish, impact life expectancy in the u.s., real estate in hong kong, and the optics industry in germany? at t. rowe price, we understand the connections of a complex, global economy. it's just one reason over 75% of our mutual funds beat their 10-year lipper average. t. rowe price. invest with confidence. request a prospectus or summary prospectus with investment information, risks, fees and expenses to read and consider carefully before investing. that make kids happy. and even fewer that make moms happy too. with wholesome noodles and bite sized chicken, nothing brings you together like chicken noodle soup from campbell's. it's amazing what soup can do. ♪ you make me happy [ female announcer ] choose the same brand your mom trusted for you. children's tylenol, the #1 brand of pain and fever relief
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 66 (some duplicates have been removed)